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Apps for Phone Games for Phone Software for PC

Port Royale 2

Port Royale 2

Reviewed on 10 December 2004

Price: AU$6.60

   

Port Royale 2 follows on from Elkware’s Anno 1503 in becoming the latest high-seas tycoon game from German developer Elkware. Elkware has switched from Anno's real-time sailing, fighting, and navigation in favor of a more leisurely, business-oriented approach in Port Royale 2. The game resembles it’s PC-based release and succeeds to a degree in capturing the grandiose overtones of swashbuckling action of the PC version. But like so many other mobile ports of games, it lacks the same depth of fluidity and makes only minor references to the original gameplay.

Toward the end of the 16th century--a period of time defined by the hegemony of the Spanish Empire in international trade and the Black Death's dread pall over Europe--myriad sailors took to the Caribbean Sea, navigating between colonial townships to buy goods at a low price in one location to then sell them at a high price elsewhere. It was a time of peerless adventure, high romance, and, most importantly, enormous profits. In Port Royale 2, you play a nameless sailor trying to make his fortune at the wheel of a shiny new pinnance.

Spend the game journeying around amassing a fortune while exploring uncharted territories, seeking new markets for your goods and establishing production locales as you go. The game is based in the Caribbean, like the other games featured here and navigation is achieved by placing your cursor over red dots to instruct your ship to move to a specific location.

   

Making money is quite straight forward. You may buy up to eight different types of goods in a particular port, including staples like wood, cloth, rum, and meat. Track the differences between commodity prices, what’s lacking and what is in abundance on the range of islands. Trade your way to riches, glory and everything in between. For instance, a northern port like Biloxi may have huge surpluses of cotton, but it may lack hemp. Meanwhile, Grenada may suffer the converse. Equalize the commercial pressure, and you'll realise a profit. Know your markets.

Other cash can be picked up by trolling bars for special missions, like smuggling goods, transporting passengers, or rescuing hostages. If you can satisfy the mission objective within a certain period of time, you'll be rewarded. Otherwise, you'll get fined. These missions are usually more trouble than they're worth, because there's no reminder screen to tell you what tasks you've been assigned or when they're due for completion. A better strategy, once you have sufficient capital, is to build your own production facilities in a number of locations. Sell to locals or take the goods yourself and sell them off at greater profits in larger markets.

It is a good idea to buy ships according to your planned activities. There are slow Cargo ships that will handle four times the cargo of your pinnance while frigates with solid armaments will finish off your enemy ships in no time. Combat is turn-based. Distance plays a key role here, in that chain shots can be used to outpace, grapeshots will get rid of crew, and cannon balls will always work a wonder smashing your opponent’s ship to smithereens. If you win, you take all – cargo and ship. If you lose, you’re left stranded at port with nothing.

The game is clean and sharp but the music leaves a little to be desired. The game has depth and is a good strategy simulator, with the end being marked when you become rich and powerful. The journey is most definitely an enjoyable one.


We give this game 8 out of 10.

Supported Handsets
Motorola - C370 C450 C550 E380 V180 V220 V300 V400 V500 V525 V600
Nokia - 3100 3200 3300 3300amer 3510i 3520 3530 3560 3586i 3595 3650 5100 6100 6200 6220 6230 6610 6800 6810 6820 7200 7210 7250 7250i 7600 3600 3660 6600 7610 7650 8910i NGage NGageQD
Samsung - E105 E710 E715 P510 E100 E700 E800 E820 X460
Sharp - GX10 GX10i GX20 GX22 GX25 GX30
Siemens - S55 S56 S57 SL55 SL56 M55 M56 MC60 C65 C66 CV65 CX65 CX66 M65 M66 CX70 S65 S66 SK65 SL65 SL66
Sony Ericsson - T610 T616 T618 Z600 T630 T637 K700i V800 Z1010 F500i K500 Z500

More information can be found at http://www.mobiletango.com

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