eNewsletter   HtmlText
 Home | Feedback |  About us | Contact us | Advertising |  Site Map Sunday, 22 October 2017 
 Current Issue
 Cover Story
 What's new
 New Releases
 Top 5 Phones
 Phone Reviews
 Future Phones
 Mobile Accessories
 Price Guide
 Buyer Guide
 
 Site Features
 Dealer Search
 Phone Comparisons
 Service Centres
 Manufacturers
 Service Providers
 Organisations
 Mobile Glossary
 Downloads
Phone Reviews
Previous Print Forward Opinion Next
Sony Ericsson W610i - Phone Review Sony Ericsson W610i review

18 September 2007
Reviewed by Miguel C. Rivera


Sony Ericsson W610i

Take a closer look!

Buy this phone from MobileSelect
Major features
  • Super slim, petite size
  • GSM 850/900/1800/1900 with GPRS and EDGE
  • 2” 262,144 colour TFD LCD @ 176 x 220 pixels
  • 2.0mpx camera with numerous settings
  • Polyphonic MIDI, MP3, AAC, and WMA support
  • FM stereo radio with RDS
  • Walkman music player
  • TrackID application
  • VideoDJ, PhotoDJ , MusicDJ and Music Mate applications
  • PlayNow online services
  • Internal memory & Memory Stick Micro slot (512MB card included)
  • USB, Bluetooth and infrared connectivity
  • SMS, MMS and POP3/IMAP email messaging
  • Access Web Front web browser with RSS feeds support
  • PIM and other organiser functions
Problems/Issues?
  • Small keys make it difficult to use for large fingers
  • Lack of games
Sales package (should contain):
Sales package
  • 1x Sony Ericsson W610i handset
  • 1x 950mAh Lithium-ion battery
  • 1x AC travel charger (100-240V)
  • 1x Stereo earphones (handsfree kit)
  • 1x USB data cable
  • 1x 512MB Memory Stick Micro card
  • 1x PC software suite CD
  • 1x User guide
  • 1x Quick start guide
  • 1x Sony Ericsson W610i features guide

Overview

Introduction
The road to transforming the humble mobile to a hybrid device has been commonly trodden by most companies in recent times. Among the competition, Sony Ericsson has made the MP3 playability a signature feature in one of their ranges and can credit a certain amount of success in doing so.

A plethora of the aptly named Walkman phones have set the standard for future phones with regards to the pure functionality of the portable music player. The Walkman range isn’t just dedicated to playing music though; the user is assured that plenty of other features can be found, packed in a neat, candy-bar form (except the W300i), displayed in a simple interface and accessed via a very distinguishable keypad alignment.

The Sony Ericsson W610i is the newest and perhaps, the thinnest and most stylish phone in the range – having similar dimensions to its more advanced but older sibling, the W880i. Having such tininess, however, did not mean the phone was to lack the heavy list of features that have become a generic quality in Sony Ericsson phones.

The W610i boasts a Walkman media player, a 2mpx camera, 262,144 colour screen, polyphonic/MP3/AAC ring-tones, flight mode, web browser, organiser, phone book, alarm clock, stopwatch, calculator, calendar, timer, tasks compilation, speakerphone, USB, Bluetooth and infra red connectivity. It doesn’t hurt to have a sizeable memory card to obtain all those mp3s, photos and videos.

As with most Sony Ericsson phones, the functionality of the W610i is outstanding. For more details, read on!

New/outstanding features 
With the exception of the W880i, Sony Ericsson phones are not known for having slim, lightweight forms. The W610i not only adds variety for the company, but also more choice for those who wish to buy a great handset without having to splurge.

Despite the ultra thin exterior, Sony Ericsson has not limited the W610i’s capabilities. Take its 2mpx camera. It has the same usability as the more expensive K800i, matches the quality found in the W880i and stores a respectable amount of photos. Like larger Sony Ericsson phones, the W610i is powered by a 950mAh battery, which means its battery life will be fairly similar to other models in the Sony Ericsson range.

Unfortunately, like the W880i, the keypad design tends to provide more aesthetic appeal than practicality. Eventually, I did start getting used to the thin keys. However, users with large fingers could face possible frustration when using this phone.

Physical aspects 

One short glance at the W610i, and it is easy to see what handset Sony Ericsson has decided to prototype. The ultra slim candy-bar shape, complimented by the shiny chrome-like, thinned out keypad and soft illuminating buttons are physical designs that are unmistakably taken from the W880i. Even its dimensions are almost identical to the measurements of the W880i. Surprisingly, the W610i is heavier, at 93 grams in weight (the W880i is 71 grams).

The biggest differences between the two are the missing silver façade, and the video conferencing lens at the front in the W610i. Nevertheless, the phone is nothing short of aesthetically pleasing. It comes in two colour schemes, Pulse Orange and Satin Black - named after the colour of the back cover.

The W610i’s front is 50% composed of the keypad and the other 50%, made up of the screen. The entire front is enclosed in a clever reflective screen cover that is easily cleaned and harder to dirty. The back and undersides are a contrasting shade of either shimmering orange or black, giving the impression that the phone is split in two. Like the W880i, the camera is positioned top right. It does however, have a self-portrait mirror. The Walkman and Sony Ericsson symbols are branded on the back as well as the front. Finally, the speakerphone is located on the back, on the bottom right.

Besides the attractive body, one key feature (no pun intended) of the W610i is the keypad. As with the W880i, the keypad differs from those found on the majority of the Sony Ericsson phones. For one thing, the keys are barely a millimetre thick and have a chrome-metallic shimmer. As complimentary as they are to the phone’s appearance, the fact is, the keys will provide a constant challenge for those with large fingers (I’m guessing, most males). Button mashing is inevitable.

I don’t regard myself as having large fingers, yet I still had some initial difficulty in creating a quick message. This is unfortunate for the phone, as the rest of its keys and buttons work perfectly well. These are found above the keypad but below the screen.

The centre navigation key is a circle with a very thin perimeter, used for navigating in four directions. At its the middle is the orange confirm button. On its left is the left navigation key and ‘back’ keys, and a soft button for the Walkman player. On its right are the right navigation and clear keys, and a soft button, for shortcuts.

During low light, the key captions etched on the face illuminate a nice orange glow. The left hand side of the phone is the memory card slot and Walkman shortcut key, below these is the charger/hands free/USB cable port. The position of the port makes it a little bit taxing to use the included hands free kit as the earphone cords can get it the way of the connector. The easy to remove battery cover hides the SIM card slot.

User interface & display 


Take a closer look!  

The W610i carries the trademark interface found on most Sony Ericsson phones. The interface is perfect as it is very simple to navigate and displays everything that needs to be shown. It exhibits the time, date, reception level bars and battery life indicators in an effective layout. It also makes every application easy to access and very straightforward to use thanks to the representation of the functions and the heavy reliance on tabs.

Those familiar with Sony Ericsson phones will quickly recognise the main menu as the 12 large icons assembled in symmetrical format. Number shortcuts can be used to access these icons as well as the text list menus underneath. Since it is part of the Walkman Phone range, it must be said that the W610i can utilise most of its applications even while the music player is in use. For instance, while keying in a SMS, the user can listen to his/her list of MP3s by minimising the player. Should he/she wish to go back to the player, a quick press of the Walkman shortcut key will take them straight there. If he/she wishes to turn off the music immediately, a press of the Walkman shortcut key will trigger a pause. Pressing the same button again will playback the song.

Fonts are similar to other Sony Ericsson phones. Seven lines of text can be displayed in menus and when writing/reading an SMS. There are four different themes included with the phone. All of these are found in the phone’s internal memory. The themes change the phone’s colour scheme, though with the W610i, even the icons and graphics change. One of the themes adjusts the main menu layout to have its icons arranged horizontally.

The handset I assessed was equipped with support for six languages – Dutch, English, French, Turkish, Zulu (African) and Sesotho (South African). It had T9 predictive text dictionaries for all of these except the African languages. The phone presents its graphics through a sufficient 2.0 inch TFD screen that has a slightly lower resolution than the W880i. Nevertheless, the display is still quite clear and bright enough for outdoor use.

Making and receiving calls 

When it comes to calling, the W610i is comparable to other Sony Ericsson handsets.

Making and taking calls is very simple, as is the transitioning of conversations from microphone to hands free, microphone to speakerphone, and vice-versa. The volume and clarity of the calls made is very good.

Reception was excellent, and is similar to my personal benchmark, the K800i.

Disregarding the amount of numbers stored on the SIM, the W610i still has enough capacity to store many numbers in the internal phonebook. Up to five numbers can be stored per entry, and they all have to be different types – one mobile, one home, one fax, etc.

To add more detail to a contact, one can also attach three email addresses, a web address, picture, a ring tone and voice command for voice-activated dialling. On another tab, one can set business and personal address details, while on the final tab a birthday date and random note information can be added. The phonebook supports speed dialling and even while on lock mode, the emergency numbers can be entered and dialled.

The W610i has 18 ring tones to choose from as default – 12 of these are in MP3 format. Music files added by the user can also be used as ring tones.

The W610i has seven different profiles with separate settings for ring type, vibration, answering mode, etc. On any of these profiles, the phone can be put on silent mode on the standby screen by holding the hash (#) button down. Holding this button again will deactivate silent mode.

Messaging 
The W610i supports SMS, MMS and email from POP3/IMAP4 servers. Several messages can be composed continuously.

The T9 dictionary and predictive text helps immensely as does the fact that the phone does not lag while writing such large messages. Whether the individual would want to might be a different story, the keys of the handset are a deterrent.

The thin keys will guarantee difficulty and they are frustration at best while messaging. Text messages can be decorated with symbols, pictures, sound effects and moving animations – although, if the receiver has a phone that isn’t a Sony Ericsson, these attachments might not work as effectively.

MMS is supported, but like most phones, you will have to resize images before attaching them due to size limits.

E-mail is accessed via the messaging icon, but is separated from the SMS and MMS shared-inbox. The composition interface looks like a PC email program, with tabs for recipient, subject, body and attachments. Messages with 6 to 7 megabyte attachments could be sent without any issues.

Connectivity 

One of the biggest differences between the W610i and the senior W880i is the connectivity options. Unlike the W880i, this Sony Ericsson does not have 3G network connectivity. It is a quad band phone, with support for GSM 850, 900, 1800 and 1900MHz bands with GPRS and EDGE data protocols. This means the phone can be used internationally without issues. Flight mode is included but can only be activated when the phone is turned on.

The W610i utilises the Access NetFront browser for full support of mobile- and PC-oriented web pages. One of the best things about this browser is that it allows the user to create folders with files and bookmarks for easy reference. The user can also view pages in full-screen mode, landscape mode, text-only mode, or zoom mode.

Close range connectivity is facilitated by USB, Bluetooth and infrared. Clearly, USB connection will be used with PCs, while Bluetooth and infrared are ideal for communication with compatible devices.

All the typical Bluetooth applications in Sony Ericsson phones, such as the remote control functions (presenter, media player and desktop) are supported. Like most Sony Ericsson models, the W610i has two modes of PC connection – Phone Mode and File Transfer. Phone mode requires drivers and software to be installed on the PC and allows data synchronisation with Sony Ericsson’s software, while file transfer mode allows direct access to the M2 memory card and doesn’t need special drivers to work. Both modes allow the W610i to recharge from the USB port.

The software package is Sony Ericsson’s typical PC Suite software. Having had a few Sony Ericsson phones myself, I am accustomed to the software. The only issues I had is that when I switched the phone to File Transfer mode for some bizarre reason the phone seems to appear disconnected. The included software, Disc2Phone, the software that can be used to transfer music files straight onto the phone is therefore very frustrating to use.

The quickest way to transfer files from PC to phone or from phone to PC is via the phone mode and through the file manager. The phone will then show up as two sets of memory: the memory stick and the phone memory. Files can then be selected and dragged, or deleted.

Multimedia package 

Sony Ericsson may have slimmed down the W610i’s exterior but underneath, is as jam packed full of multimedia features as with the rest of the Walkman Phone range.

As usual, the Walkman music player functions perfectly, is very easy to use and is loud enough for general commuters. Play modes are limited to shuffle and loop, and a number of presets are included for the equaliser including Treble Boost and Mega Bass. Personally, being able to manually adjust the equaliser settings is very positive thing as adds to the player’s dexterity and means that the user doesn’t have to rely on the default presets.

Album covers can be seen though only when the music player isn’t minimised. These appear small and contain very little detail. Alternatively, visualisations can also be utilised. As mentioned earlier, the player can be minimised with music playing while the user is trying out other applications such as the camera. Obviously, a function that uses sound such as when receiving or making calls will automatically turn off music.

As to be expected, the small speaker, generally used during speakerphone mode, is not great for showing off those tunes. The best way to go is to use the hands free kit, which is actually a set of stereo earphones that are better than most included hands free headsets!

The W610i’s included earphones sit well inside the user’s ear and produce great bass and treble to please a number of audiophiles. For those who are harder to please, the hands free kit has a 3.5mm jack, giving the user the option to use their own headset. Video playback is the same as other Sony Ericsson phones – via the file manager.

The TrackID service was not successful when attempting to identify my MP3 tracks. This could be caused by a number of factors and might not have anything to do with the phone - one of my colleagues assures me that the service is almost foolproof. I’m not 100% sure why it failed to register during this assessment. Some of my music files were remixed editions, but even when examining original songs, TrackID failed to receive information.

Other multimedia applications worth mentioning are the VideoDJ, PhotoDJ, MusicDJ and Music Mate applications.

VideoDJ is a nice inclusion that allows the user to compile photos, clips and music to create his/her own video clips. The clips can then be stored in memory to be replayed or sent.

PhotoDJ is also a great addition as it allows the user to edit any picture/photo in memory. The following can be adjusted: the light balance, brightness/contrast levels, red-eye effect, positioning of the picture, appearance (negative, cartoon, frosted glass and painting effect) and the addition of frames and clipart. If the user accepts the changes made, he/she will end of creating a new picture from their editing. The original photo will be left intact.

MusicDJ allows the user to create their very own ring tones while Music Mate is a fairly useless application that can play the various keys and notes of three instruments (piano, guitar and metronome).

PIM applications 
The W610i is equipped with a number of personal organiser tools. The alarm and the calendar will probably be most frequently used of the lot. There’s also a task list, notepad, timer, stopwatch, and a code memo program for storing important passwords.

It is worth mentioning that phone utilises a white light to brighten areas for photography and also serves as a flashlight (under the light function in the Organizer icon). The light can be turned on permanently, for one minute or in SOS mode.

Build quality 

At first glance, the W610i appears as fragile as it is thin. Looks can be very deceiving!

The handset is relatively durable and solidly built. Even though I have yet to drop the handset, the phone certainly appears to have a tough casing that should withstand minor falls. The screen, at least, should be intact, thanks to the smooth plastic casing.

Perhaps the only downfall is the camera lens being prone to damage due to the lack of a proper lens cover.

Battery life 
The W610i comes with a 950mAh battery. After testing the phone it was found that the battery provides less life than the claimed 7 hours of talk time and 350 hours standby time on a GSM network, which is to be expected.

I tested the battery life by charging the phone completely and using it for the duration that the battery would allow. During this time I used the phone as normal, creating three to five text messages a day and making two to three calls (lasting 10 minutes maximum). I tend to receive at least one call a day – such conversations last a maximum of 10 minutes.

The W610i lasted for about 60+ hours before another charging was needed. Admittedly, the camera, music player and alarm clock were the most commonly used applications, some of which are very battery intensive.

During the use of other applications, the music player was sometimes minimised and music continued to play. In comparison to my personal benchmark, the K800i, the battery life of the W610i is similar and in my opinion, very sufficient. The battery takes 2-3 hours to recharge completely.

(Page 1 of 5)

Next Page  


Sony Ericsson W610i review

Table of contents

Table of contents:

Overview (Page 1)
Camera & Video performance (Page 2)
Major features (Page 3)
Problems/issues (Page 4)
In Summary/Checklist (Page 5)

Advertisements
click here
[Jul 2008]
Sony Ericsson K660i
[Jul 2008]
Samsung SGH-i450
[Jul 2008]
HTC Touch Cruise
[Jun 2008]
Motorola RAZR2 V9
[Jun 2008]
Nokia E51
[May 2008]
HTC P3470
[May 2008]
Nokia N81 8GB
[Apr 2008]
HTC Touch Dual
[Mar 2008]
3 Skypephone
[Mar 2008]
Nokia 5610 XpressMusic
[Mar 2008]
Samsung U300
[Feb 2008]
LG KU990 Viewty
[Jan 2008]
Nokia 6500 Classic
[Jan 2008]
Sony Ericsson K850i
[Jan 2008]
Nokia 6500 Slide
[Dec 2007]
Telstra F256
[Dec 2007]
Palm Treo 500v
[Nov 2007]
Nokia 6120
[Nov 2007]
LG KE850 Prada
[Oct 2007]
Sharp 880SH
[Oct 2007]
Sony Ericsson W580i
[Oct 2007]
HTC P3450 Touch
[Sep 2007]
Sony Ericsson K810i
[Sep 2007]
Sony Ericsson W610i
[Aug 2007]
Nokia 6110 Navigator
[Aug 2007]
Sony Ericsson P1i
[Aug 2007]
Motorola ROKR E6
[Aug 2007]
Sony Ericsson Z310i
[Jul 2007]
Dopod D810
[Jul 2007]
Motorola RIZR Z3
[Jun 2007]
Sony Ericsson W200i
[Jun 2007]
Samsung X830
[May 2007]
Nokia E65
[May 2007]
O2 Atom Life
[May 2007]
Motorola F3
[May 2007]
Samsung i600 BlackJack
[Apr 2007]
Nokia N95
[Apr 2007]
LG Shine KU970
[Apr 2007]
Palm Treo 750
[Apr 2007]
Nokia 6300
[Mar 2007]
Sony Ericsson W880i
[Mar 2007]
Nokia N93i
[Mar 2007]
O2 Graphite
[Mar 2007]
O2 Xda Zinc
[Mar 2007]
Motorola KRZR K1
[Feb 2007]
Nokia 5300
[Feb 2007]
Dopod 838Pro
[Feb 2007]
Sony Ericsson W850i
[Jan 2007]
Sony Ericsson W950i
[Dec 2006]
Mio A701
[Dec 2006]
LG TU500
[Dec 2006]
Nokia 5500
[Dec 2006]
Samsung SGH-i320N
[Nov 2006]
Samsung SGH-D900
[Nov 2006]
Samsung SGH-A701
[Nov 2006]
Sony Ericsson Z610i
[Oct 2006]
Nokia N73
[Oct 2006]
Sagem myX6-2
[Oct 2006]
Nokia 6233
[Sep 2006]
Nokia E61
[Sep 2006]
Nokia 6131
[Aug 2006]
Sony Ericsson K800i
[Aug 2006]
Sony Ericsson K610i/V630i
[Aug 2006]
Nokia N80
[Jul 2006]
LG M6100
[Jun 2006]
LG KG800
[Jun 2006]
Motorola V3x
[Jun 2006]
Nokia 6103
[Jun 2006]
Motorola SLVR L7
[May 2006]
Sony Ericsson W810i
[Apr 2006]
Motorola PEBL U6
[Apr 2006]
Sony Ericsson W900i
[Apr 2006]
Nokia 7370
[Mar 2006]
Nokia 6280
[Mar 2006]
O2 XDA Atom
[Mar 2006]
Sharp 903
[Feb 2006]
Sony Ericsson Z520i
[Feb 2006]
Nokia N90
[Jan 2006]
LG U880
[Jan 2006]
Samsung SGH-D600
[Dec 2005]
Sony Ericsson W550i
[Dec 2005]
LG M4410
[Dec 2005]
NEC N412i
[Dec 2005]
Panasonic MX6
[Dec 2005]
Motorola E1 ROKR
[Nov 2005]
NEC N600i
[Nov 2005]
Samsung SGH-Z500
[Nov 2005]
Sony Ericsson W800i
[Oct 2005]
NEC N411i
[Oct 2005]
Motorola A840
[Sep 2005]
Sony Ericsson K608i
[Sep 2005]
LG F2400
[Aug 2005]
Samsung E720 & E730
[Aug 2005]
Sony Ericsson K750i
[Jul 2005]
O2 xphone IIm
[Jul 2005]
LG F1200
[Jun 2005]
Sony Ericsson Z800i
[Jun 2005]
Motorola V635
[Jun 2005]
NEC N410i
[Jun 2005]
Sony Ericsson K300i
[May 2005]
PalmOne Treo 650
[May 2005]
Sharp GX25
[May 2005]
Nokia 9300
[Apr 2005]
Panasonic X700
[Apr 2005]
Motorola E1000
[Mar 2005]
O2 Xda IIs
[Mar 2005]
Nokia 7270
[Mar 2005]
Motorola V620
[Mar 2005]
O2 Xphone II
[Feb 2005]
Nokia 7260
[Feb 2005]
Motorola V3
[Feb 2005]
Nokia 3220
[Jan 2005]
Sony Ericsson S700i
[Jan 2005]
Siemens SL65
[Dec 2004]
Nokia 6260
[Dec 2004]
Nokia 6670
[Dec 2004]
Sony Ericsson K500i
[Dec 2004]
Siemens S65
[Dec 2004]
Sony Ericsson P910i
[Nov 2004]
Samsung SGH-E800
[Nov 2004]
Siemens M65
[Nov 2004]
Motorola V80
[Nov 2004]
Siemens CX65
[Oct 2004]
Nokia 5140
[Oct 2004]
Sony Ericsson Z1010
[Sep 2004]
Nokia 7610
[Sep 2004]
Motorola E398
[Sep 2004]
Siemens C65
[Aug 2004]
Motorola MPx200
[Aug 2004]
Nokia 7600
[Jul 2004]
Sony Ericsson K700i
[Jul 2004]
Nokia 6820
[Jul 2004]
Sharp GX30
[Jul 2004]
Samsung SGH-P510
[Jun 2004]
NEC e616V (3G)
[Jun 2004]
LG U8110 (3G)
[Jun 2004]
Nokia 6230
[Jun 2004]
Sony Ericsson Z200
[Jun 2004]
Nokia 6600
[May 2004]
DBtel 6668
[May 2004]
Sony Ericsson T630
[Apr 2004]
Nokia 3100
[Apr 2004]
Siemens SX1
[Apr 2004]
Nokia 3200
[Mar 2004]
Sony Ericsson P900
[Mar 2004]
Panasonic X70
[Mar 2004]
Samsung SGH-E700
[Feb 2004]
Panasonic G50
[Feb 2004]
Nokia 6220
[Jan 2004]
Sony Ericsson Z600
[Jan 2004]
Sony Ericsson T230
[Jan 2004]
Nokia 7250i
[Jan 2004]
LG G7020
[Dec 2003]
Sharp GX20
[Dec 2003]
O2 Xphone
[Nov 2003]
Samsung SGH-V200
[Oct 2003]
Siemens SL55
[Jun 2003]
Samsung SGH-S200
[Jun 2003]
Sony Ericsson T310
[May 2003]
Samsung SCH-A561
[May 2003]
Siemens A55
[May 2003]
Samsung SGH-A500
[May 2003]
Samsung SGH-T400/408
[Apr 2003]
Nokia 7250
[Apr 2003]
Nokia 5100
[Apr 2003]
Sagem myX-3
[Apr 2003]
Samsung SGH-S300
[Mar 2003]
Nokia 3510i
[Mar 2003]
Samsung SGH-A800
[Mar 2003]
Nokia 2100
[Mar 2003]
Sagem myX-5d
[Mar 2003]
Samsung SGH-T500
[Feb 2003]
Siemens S55
[Feb 2003]
Motorola C350
[Feb 2003]
Nokia 3650
[Feb 2003]
Sony Ericsson P800
[Jan 2003]
Nokia 3530
[Jan 2003]
Nokia 6385
[Jan 2003]
Sharp GX10
[Jan 2003]
Panasonic GD55
[Dec 2002]
Nokia 6100
[Dec 2002]
Siemens C55/2128
[Dec 2002]
Sony Ericsson T100
[Dec 2002]
Panasonic GD87/88
[Dec 2002]
Nokia 6610
[Nov 2002]
Sony Ericsson T300
[Nov 2002]
Nokia 9210i
[Nov 2002]
Motorola C330
[Nov 2002]
Panasonic GD67/68
[Nov 2002]
Motorola E360
[Nov 2002]
Samsung SCH-N181
[Oct 2002]
Motorola T720
[Oct 2002]
Samsung SGH-T208
[Oct 2002]
Motorola V60i
[Oct 2002]
Siemens CL50
[Oct 2002]
Nokia 7210
[Oct 2002]
Samsung SGH-Q200
[Sep 2002]
Sony Ericsson T600
[Sep 2002]
O2 xda
[Sep 2002]
Ericsson T66
[Sep 2002]
Philips Fisio 620
[Sep 2002]
Motorola A388
[Sep 2002]
Sony Ericsson T200
[Aug 2002]
Siemens M50
[Aug 2002]
Samsung SGH-S100
[Aug 2002]
Handspring Treo 270
[Aug 2002]
Nokia 3610
[Jul 2002]
Nokia 3510
[Jul 2002]
Ericsson R600
[Jul 2002]
Nokia 3410
[Jul 2002]
Nokia 7650
[Jul 2002]
Handspring Treo 180/180g
[Jul 2002]
Nokia 6310i
[Jul 2002]
Ericsson T60c
[Jun 2002]
Nokia 3315
[Jun 2002]
Nokia 8910
[Jun 2002]
Philips Fisio 820
[Jun 2002]
Motorola T190
[May 2002]
Samsung T100
[May 2002]
Nokia 9210
[May 2002]
Sony Ericsson T68i
[Apr 2002]
Nokia 6310
[Apr 2002]
Samsung A400
[Apr 2002]
Samsung A212i
[Apr 2002]
Motorola P7689
[Apr 2002]
Panasonic GD75
[Apr 2002]
Panasonic GD95
[Mar 2002]
Samsung N620
[Mar 2002]
Motorola V70
[Mar 2002]
Nokia 5210
[Mar 2002]
Samsung A300
[Mar 2002]
Nokia 8855
[Feb 2002]
Siemens S45
[Feb 2002]
Ericsson T65
[Feb 2002]
Nokia 6510
[Feb 2002]
Nokia 3350
[Jan 2002]
Siemens ME45
[Jan 2002]
Nokia 5510
[Dec 2001]
Ericsson T68m
[Dec 2001]
Ericsson T39m
[Dec 2001]
Hyundai HGC-610E
[Dec 2001]
Siemens SL45
[Dec 2001]
Ericsson A3618s
[Nov 2001]
Nokia 8310
[Nov 2001]
Ericsson T29s
[Oct 2001]
Motorola v60
[Sep 2001]
Ericsson R380
[Mar 2001]
Ericsson A2618s
[Feb 2001]
Panasonic GD92
[Jan 2001]
Panasonic GD52
[Dec 2000]
Philips Savvy Vogue
[Nov 2000]
Sony CMD-Z5
[Oct 2000]
Samsung SGH-M100
[Aug 2000]
Motorola Accompli A6188
[Jun 2000]
Nokia 7110
[May 2000]
Nokia 8850 & 8210
[Apr 2000]
Panasonic GD90
 
Previous Print Forward Opinion Next
| Home |  | Site Map |  | Contacts |  | About us |  | Feedback |  | Advertising |  
Last Updated on 31 March, 2009
Copyright 2000-2008  iMobile.com.au  All Right Reserved  Terms of Use